Year 6 children will be working to master these curriculum skills during the current academic year.

Learning objectives are categorised by colour and describe the level of knowledge, skill and understanding that each child should acquire during the course of the topic:

Knowledge
Knowledge: facts, information, and skills acquired through experience or education
Skills
The ability to do something
Understanding
Understanding: the combination of knowledge and skills, applied together in order to comprehend a subject

Select a Term with the buttons below.

Autumn
Spring
Summer

Autumn Term: Journey and Pilgrimage

Spitfire

Knowledge
  • Independently develop a range of ideas which show curiosity, imagination and originality
  • Systematically investigate, research and test ideas and plans using sketchbooks and other appropriate approaches. (for instance. Sketchbooks will show in advance how work will be produced and how the qualities of materials will be used)
  • Independently take action to refine their technical and craft skills in order to improve their mastery of materials and techniques
  • Independently select and effectively use relevant processes in order to create successful and finished work
  • Provide a reasoned evaluation of both their own and professionals’ work which takes account of the starting points, intentions and context behind the work
  • By the end of Yr. 6 pupils should know:
  • How to describe, interpret and explain the work, ideas and working practices of some significant artists, craftspeople, designers and architects taking account of the influence of the different historical, cultural and social contexts in which they worked.
  • About the technical vocabulary and techniques for modifying the qualities of different materials and processes.
Skills
  • Sketching.E. Bengal Bayly
  • To experiment with wet media to create different marks, lines, patterns, textures and shapes.
  • To use different techniques for a range of purposes including shading and hatching.
  • To explore colour mixing and blending techniques with coloured pencils.
  • Sculpture Paul Cummins
  • To use recycled, natural and man –made materials to create a sculpture.
  • To shape, form, model and construct from observation and imagination.
  • To plan a sculpture through drawing and other preparatory work.
  • Painting Paul Nash
  • To develop a painting from a drawing.
  • To carry out preliminary research on painting.
  • To explore different media, materials and mixing appropriate colours.
  • Combine outcomes of sculpture and sketching and painting.
Understanding
  • Can they explain why they have combined different tools to create their drawings?
  • Can they explain why they have chosen specific drawing techniques?
  • Can they explain what their own style is?
  • Can they use a wide range of techniques in their work?
  • Can they explain why they have chosen specific painting techniques?
  • Can they make a record about the styles and qualities in their work?
  • Can they say what their work is influenced by?
  • Can they include technical aspects in their work, e.g. architectural design?
  • Do their sketch books contain detailed notes, and quotes explaining about items?
  • Do they compare their methods to those of others and keep notes in their sketch books?
  • Do they combine graphics and text based research of commercial design, for example magazines etc., to influence the layout of their sketch books.
  • Do they adapt and refine their work to reflect its meaning and purpose, keeping notes and annotations in their sketch books?
Knowledge
  • How to use learning from science to help design and make products that work
  • How to use learning from mathematics to help design and make products that work
  • That materials have both functional properties and aesthetic qualities
  • That materials can be combined and mixed to create more useful characteristics
  • That mechanical and electrical systems have an input, process and output the correct technical vocabulary for the projects they are undertaking
Skills
  • Food/ textiles
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross- sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and CAD.
  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose.
  • Accurately apply a range of finishing techniques, including those from art and design.
  • Draw up a specification for their design- link with Mathematics and Science.
  • Plan the order of their work, choosing appropriate materials, tools and techniques. Suggest alternative methods of making if the first attempts fail.
  • Identify the strengths and areas for development in their ideas and products.
  • Know how much products cost to make, how sustainable and innovative they are and the impact products have beyond their intended purpose.
Understanding
  • Work confidently within a range of contexts, such as the home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment
  • Describe the purpose of their products indicate the design features of their products that will appeal to intended users
  • Explain how particular parts of their products work
  • Carry out research, using surveys, interviews, questionnaires and web-based resources
  • Identify the needs, wants, preferences and values of particular individuals and groups develop a simple design specification to guide their thinking
  • Share and clarify ideas through discussion
  • How things work ideas model their ideas using prototypes and pattern pieces use annotated sketches, cross-sectional drawings and exploded diagrams to develop and communicate their ideas
  • Use computer-aided design to develop and communicate their ideas generate innovative ideas, drawing on research make design decisions, taking account of constraints such as time, resources and cost
Knowledge
  • Locate countries within Europe that were part of WW2 and their capital cities.
  • Identify similarities and differences between these countries.
  • Identify travel routes that may have been taken for people to travel back then.
  • Recognise land patterns and understand how some of these have changed over time.
Skills
  • To use globes, maps and digi maps to locate the countries in Europe.
  • Use the eight points of a compass, four and six figure grid references, symbols and leys.
  • Compare past maps to those of today. How have they changed?
  • Study land use and settlements pre and post war compared to the modern day.
Understanding
  • To be able to name countries within Europe and their capital cities.
  • Present findings between the similarities and differences between these countries including location and cultures.
  • Highlight travel routes that may have been taken for people to travel between these countries.
  • Recognise land patterns and understand how some of these have changed over time.
  • Study photographs, ariel photographs and maps of pre-war, post-war and present day. Compare the similarities and differences. What might be the reasons for the differences?

Thematic British study Post 1066– WW2

Knowledge
  • Continue to develop chronologically secure knowledge of history through eras studied and contrasting and similar surrounding eras to gather a holistic view of the passing of time.
  • Establish clear narratives within and across periods studied applying historical terms confidently and accurately.
  • Show an understanding of connections, contrasts and trends over time, building on prior chronological knowledge and understanding, through studied era/s.
Skills
  • Develop the appropriate use of historical terms.
  • Apply historical terms throughout other areas of historical learning.
Understanding
  • Regularly address and devise historically valid questions.
  • Construct informed responses by selecting and organising relevant historical information.

Greetings, Numbers 1-100, Time, War time French phrases

Knowledge
  • Listen attentively to spoken language and show understanding by joining in and responding.
  • Children can listen and show understanding of words, phrases and sentences and join in/respond in an appropriate way.
  • Explore the patterns and sounds of language through songs and rhymes and link the spelling, sound and meaning of words.
  • Children can read or listen to a short text with a familiar rhyme/song and can identify patterns of language and letter strings
  • ngage in conversations; ask and answer questions; express opinions and respond to those of others; seek clarification and help
  • Children can ask and answer questions on a variety of topics expressing opinions with understandable accuracy, using word/picture prompts
  • Speak in sentences, using familiar vocabulary, phrases and basic language structures.
  • Children use their knowledge of the letter strings and sounds to read an unfamiliar text with understandable accuracy.
  • Present ideas and information orally to a range of audiences.
  • Manipulate language using a language scaffold to present their own ideas and information in more complex sentences.
  • Develop accurate pronunciation and intonation so that others understand when they are reading aloud or using familiar words and phrases.
  • Children can attempt to say an unfamiliar word using their knowledge of letter strings, silent letter rules and liaison (the letters s, x, z, t, d, n and m are usually silent however if the next word begins with a vowel then they are pronounced)
  • Key phonemes/graphemes: ch, ou, é/er/et/ez, gn, on/an, in/ain, oi and awareness of silent letters
Skills
  • Read carefully and show understanding of words, phrases and simple writing.
  • Children can attempt to read for follow more complex sentences with understandable accuracy using familiar vocabulary and when they come across unfamiliar vocabulary they can understand the gist of what is being said.
  • Broaden their vocabulary and develop their ability to understand new words that are introduced into the familiar written material, including through using a dictionary.
Children can find out the meaning of new words by reading around the word.
  • Children can also use a bi-lingual dictionary to accurately read and understand the meaning and word class of a word- is it a noun, adjective etc?
Understanding
  • Describe people, places, things and actions orally and in writing.
  • Write phrases from memory, and adapt these to create new sentences, to express ideas clearly
  • Children can write some familiar complex sentences to describe people, places and actions, from memory, using a language scaffold, with understandable accuracy including the use of simple connectives and adjectives.
  • Children are aware that if a noun is masculine, the adjective also needs to be masculine-children can demonstrate this in their writing.
  • Children show an awareness to the definite articles (le, la, les etc) what they mean and when you use them in relation the gender of a word. Children also show an understanding of the placement of adjectives before or after the noun.
  • Il est … heures
  • Il est, Elle est
  • Je suis…
  • As-tu?
  • Comment tu t’apelles?
  • Quel age as-tu?
  • J’ai

Theme 3- Living in the Wider World

Knowledge
  • Why and how rules and laws that protect themselves and others are made and enforced, why different rules are needed in different situations and how to take part in making and changing rules to realise the consequences of anti-social and aggressive behaviours such as bullying and discrimination on individuals and communities
  • That there are different kinds of responsibilities, rights and duties at home, at school, in the community and towards the environment.
Skills
  • Rule of Law
  • Teach pupils aspects of both civil and criminal law and discuss how this might differ from some religious law.
  • Help pupils understand that living under the rule of law protects individuals.
Understanding
  • Pilgrimage-Journey/Interpretation
Knowledge
  • Can select and refine appropriate skills according to the strengths and weaknesses of an opponent.
  • Can mark an opponent and knows appropriate skills to win the ball or prevent them from receiving the ball.
  • Knows the 9 fielding positions. Moves into effective fielding positions for different batters.
  • Can help umpire. Knows how to score half rounders.
  • Can design and perform imaginative sequences remembering and repeating with confidence and fluency.
  • Identify where strength and suppleness in required in their own and others work and devise safe warm-up and cool down routines to address them.
  • Can perform ideas that express comic, dramatic or abstract ideas.
  • Can identify strengths and weaknesses in their own and others performances.
  • Can explain how the practice they are using will affect their performance.
  • Can use appropriate dance terminology to describe, analyse, interpret and evaluate.
  • Pupils can describe what they can do to improve their fitness.
  • Pupils can utilise their core strength to perform to a high level.
Skills
  • To travel appropriately and effectively dependent on the sporting activity.
  • To apply different throwing and catching techniques with consistent control and accuracy.
  • Can perform a range of throwing, jumping and running skills with control, accuracy, power and good technique.
  • Demonstrates a good range of skills used over different times and distances
  • Can use an increasing variety of passing and receiving techniques with precision and control.
  • Bowls accurately with few no balls, shows good snap of the wrist release, shows correct stance, times swing with correct arm action.
  • Catches most hits but may drop a high ball under pressure.
  • Stops hard ground balls using long barrier.
  • Throws deep field
  • Hits ball with power towards spaces.
  • Show control, balance and strength.
  • Perform advanced movements with agility and co-ordination.
  • Perform single and linked actions accurately including a wider range of skills, actions and agilities; rolls, flights partner supports and balances and some vaults showing tension, extension and weight transfer.
Understanding
  • Performs effectively in different events by adapting their skills to meet the challenges and tasks set.
  • Understands backwards hit rules.
  • Applies tactics in game situations.
  • Can create and perform dances taking into account a range of movements, motifs, group relationships and available space.
  • To be able to work as an effective team member by communicating, collaborating and leading where appropriate.
  • Show increasing awareness of how to cope with orienteering events successfully.
  • Plan and trial their skills accurately, effectively and confidently.
  • Have confidence to attempt new tasks.
  • Make effective decisions.
  • Adapt approaches to meet the challenges of different environments.
  • Take on roles and responsibilities.
  • Can analyse their own and others’ performance including the role of an official and identify ways they can improve.
  • Pupils modify and refine skills and techniques to improve their performance.
  • Pupils refine skills and techniques to improve performance.
  • Pupils analyse and comment on skills and techniques.
  • Review their work identifying strengths and weaknesses.
  • Suggest alternative approaches.
  • Try out different approaches.
  • Can apply knowledge after evaluation to improve their work.
  • Can analyse a performance against specific criteria and give accurate feedback.
  • Can identify specific aspects for improvement in their own and others work and utilise them.

RE Concept: Pilgrimage / Journey

Link to Whole School Focus: Our learning journey, role within this and goals.

RE Focus: pilgrimages of believers to special places with a particular focus on the Islamic Hajj and Catholic pilgrimage to Lourdes.

RE Concept: Interpretation

RE Focus: Text study of the birth narratives in the New Testament. Exploration into similarities and differences.

Knowledge
  • Autumn 1: Christian teaching about the importance of specific values, eg: love, forgiveness, self-sacrifice, justice, commitment.
  • Islam: The Five Pillars of Islam
  • The pattern, meaning and symbolism associated with the Five Pillars of Faith, ie: Hajj (pilgrimage) to Makkah and Id-ul-Adha.
  • Autumn 2: Christmas
  • Festivals and celebrations Christmas, Holy Week and Easter, eg: the story, celebrations, symbols and meanings associated with Christmas, Holy Week and Easter.
  • The Bible: The nature, importance and significance of the Bible for Christians, eg: as a source for Christian belief and teaching, that it includes many books and is divided into the Old and New Testaments, that the Old Testament originates from the Jewish tradition, that it includes different kinds of literature, for example, history, law, poetry, story, some Christians read it daily, that different Christians interpret it in different ways.
Skills
  • Communicate
  • Reflect on their own experience of, and responses to, the concept.
  • Respond to others’ ideas and situations.
  • Recognise human experience which may be different from their own.
  • Express how their responses to the concept may be applied in specific situations.
  • Identify the issues raised in applying their responses to specific situations.
  • Recognise some of the difficulties or problems involved in developing a coherent set of beliefs and values.
  • Recognise the complexity of concepts.
  • Frame questions (problematising the concept).
  • Define and analyse concepts by forming criteria.
  • Give good reasons and distinguish good from bad reasons.
  • Construct inferences (if … then …).
  • Explore the interpretation of concepts. demand further engagement.
  • Recognise that differing religious, social and cultural contexts influence interpretations and raise sometimes controversial issues that demand further engagement.
  • Express and communicate their understanding of why context influences interpretation of a concept.
  • Build capacity to compare different interpretations of concepts by giving examples.
  • Show sensitivity to the interpretations of the concept in the context.
  • Form an evaluative judgement about the significance of the concept within the given context and without.
  • Discern and clarify the reasons behind different judgements, including their own and those of others.
  • Recognise specific characteristics which make a difference in forming a judgement.
  • Express the value the concept has beyond the context.
Understanding
  • Describe and explain concepts that are common to many religions (for example, deity, sacred, myth, symbol, ritual, rites of passage, pilgrimage)
  • Describe and explain how a concept is expressed in different ways in Christianity and one (or more) other religions (for example, how different denominations in Christianity regard pilgrimage and the significance of the Hajj to Muslims)
  • Describe and explain their own opinions about the way religious concepts are expressed (for example, what do pupils think about the value of Christians making a pilgrimage to Lourdes or Muslims making a pilgrimage to Makkah?)
  • Describe and explain their own views about a concept (for example, do pupils value the idea of going on a journey to remember something significant?)
  • Describe and explain when and how a concept has applied to events or experiences in their own or others’ lives (for example, pupils describe where, when and why they have been or would like to go on a journey to remember something significant – such as to the house where dad was born or a revered football ground).

Light and electricity and sound

Knowledge
  • Recognise that light appears to travel in straight lines
  • Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eye
  • Explain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or from light sources to objects and then to our eyes
  • Use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them
  • Associate the brightness of a lamp or the volume of a buzzer with the number and voltage of cells used in the circuit
  • Compare and give reasons for variations in how components function, including the brightness of bulbs, the loudness of buzzers and the on/off position of switches
  • Use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit in a diagram
Skills
  • Independently planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer their own questions around the key ideas and those questions raised during other enquiries.
  • Taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate, applying skills of mathematics when appropriate to work out the average.
  • To make predictions applying existing, knowledge, skills and understanding.
Understanding
  • Animals see objects when light is reflected off that object and enters their eyes.
  • Animals see light sources when light travels from the source into their eyes.
  • Sounds are produces when an object vibrates.
  • Sound moves through objects by making them vibrate.
  • Bigger vibrations produce louder sounds and smaller vibrations produce quieter sounds
  • Changing the way an object vibrates changes its sound.
  • Changing the shape, size of an object will change the sound it produces.

Spring Term: The Hunt

Tyrannosaurus Rex

Knowledge
  • Independently develop a range of ideas which show curiosity, imagination and originality
  • Systematically investigate, research and test ideas and plans using sketchbooks and other appropriate approaches. (for instance. Sketchbooks will show in advance how work will be produced and how the qualities of materials will be used)
  • Independently take action to refine their technical and craft skills in order to improve their mastery of materials and techniques
  • Independently select and effectively use relevant processes in order to create successful and finished work
  • Provide a reasoned evaluation of both their own and professionals’ work which takes account of the starting points, intentions and context behind the work
  • By the end of Yr. 6 pupils should know:
  • How to describe, interpret and explain the work, ideas and working practices of some significant artists, craftspeople, designers and architects taking account of the influence of the different historical, cultural and social contexts in which they worked.
  • About the technical vocabulary and techniques for modifying the qualities of different materials and processes.
Skills
  • ICT
  • To record, collect and store visual information using digital cameras and video recorders.
  • To present recorded visual images using software.
  • To create and manipulate images
  • To develop an understanding that digital images are created by layering.
  • To create layered images from my initial ideas.
  • Painting Picasso
  • To apply my prior knowledge of painting techniques from the Autumn term.
  • To create imaginative work from a variety of sources.
  • To mix and match colours to create atmosphere and light effects.
  • Sketching Van Gogh
  • To develop my own style using tonal contrast and mixed media.
  • To begin to use perspective using a single focal point and horizon.
  • Sculpture Jeff Koons
  • To apply techniques I learnt within the Autumn term.
  • To develop skills in using clay (Inc. slabs, coils and slips)
  • To produce intricate patterns and textures in a malleable media.
Understanding
  • Can they explain why they have combined different tools to create their drawings?
  • Can they explain why they have chosen specific drawing techniques?
  • Can they explain what their own style is?
  • Can they use a wide range of techniques in their work?
  • Can they explain why they have chosen specific painting techniques?
  • Can they make a record about the styles and qualities in their work?
  • Can they say what their work is influenced by?
  • Can they include technical aspects in their work, e.g. architectural design?
  • Do their sketch books contain detailed notes, and quotes explaining about items?
  • Do they compare their methods to those of others and keep notes in their sketch books?
  • Do they combine graphics and text based research of commercial design, for example magazines etc., to influence the layout of their sketch books.
  • Do they adapt and refine their work to reflect its meaning and purpose, keeping notes and annotations in their sketch books?
Knowledge
  • How to reinforce and strengthen a 3D framework that a 3D textiles product can be made from a combination of fabric shapes
  • That a recipe can be adapted by adding or substituting one or more ingredients
  • Where food comes from Food preparation, cooking and nutrition that food is grown
  • How mechanical systems such as cams or pulleys or gears create movement
  • How more complex electrical circuits and components can be used to create functional products
  • How to program a computer to monitor changes in the environment and control their products
Skills
  • Construction
  • Confidently select appropriate tools, materials, components and techniques and use them.
  • Use tools safely and accurately.
  • Assemble components to make working models.
  • Aim to make and to achieve a quality product.
  • With confidence pin, sew and stitch materials together to create a product.
  • Demonstrate when make modifications as they go along.
  • Construct products using permanent joining techniques.
  • Know how more complex electrical circuits and components can be used to create functional product and how to program a computer to monitor changes in the environment and control their products.
  • Know how to reinforce and strengthen a 3D framework.
  • Understand that mechanical and electrical systems have an input, process and output.
  • Use finishing techniques to strengthen and improve the appearance of their product using a range of equipment including ICT.
  • Understand how mechanical systems such as cams or pulleys or gears create movement.
  • Evaluate their products, identifying strengths and areas for development, and carrying out appropriate tests.
  • Evaluate their work both during and at the end of the assignment. Record their evaluations using drawings with labels.
Understanding
  • Work confidently within a range of contexts, such as the home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment
  • Describe the purpose of their products indicate the design features of their products that will appeal to intended users
  • Explain how particular parts of their products work
  • Carry out research, using surveys, interviews, questionnaires and web-based resources
  • Identify the needs, wants, preferences and values of particular individuals and groups develop a simple design specification to guide their thinking
  • Share and clarify ideas through discussion
  • How things work ideas model their ideas using prototypes and pattern pieces use annotated sketches, cross-sectional drawings and exploded diagrams to develop and communicate their ideas
  • Use computer-aided design to develop and communicate their ideas generate innovative ideas, drawing on research make design decisions, taking account of constraints such as time, resources and cost
Knowledge
  • To understand the position and significance of the Arctic and Antarctica circle.
  • Identify Prime/Greenwich Meridian and may comparisons of time zones in different areas of the world including night and day.
  • Explain key features of physical geography including climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts
  • Explain key features of human geography such as distribution of food, minerals and water.
Skills
  • Use maps, globes and digi maps to locate some of the coldest places in the world.
  • Use and explain the term ‘climate zone’
  • Identify the different climate zones around the world and find out what affects them.
  • Use maps to identify different climate zones. Discuss and compare how these are compared to the climate of the UK.
  • Use and explain the term ‘biome’ and children to make suggestions for places in the world which may be biomes.
  • Use photographs of the Arctic Circle and Antarctica and raise questions about the climate and living condition there. How do people and animals survive here?
Understanding
  • Make predictions from previous knowledge as to where the hottest place in the world would be.
  • Understand the terms climate zones and biomes.
  • Compare the climates of The Arctic Circle and The Antarctica to that of the UK.

Pre-historic History

Knowledge
  • Continue to develop chronologically secure knowledge of history through eras studied and contrasting and similar surrounding eras to gather a holistic view of the passing of time.
  • Establish clear narratives within and across periods studied applying historical terms confidently and accurately.
  • Show an understanding of connections, contrasts and trends over time, building on prior chronological knowledge and understanding, through studied era/s.
Skills
  • Continue to develop the appropriate use of historical terms.
  • Apply historical terms throughout other areas of historical learning.
Understanding
  • Understand that different versions of the past may exist, giving some reasons for this.
  • Understand how knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources and how the reliability of these sources affects our understanding.
  • Continue to regularly address and devise historically valid questions.
  • Construct informed responses by selecting and organising relevant historical information.

French book study (E.G. Lucie chat a la fete) or dinosaur book

Knowledge
  • Listen attentively to spoken language and show understanding by joining in and responding.
  • Children can listen and show understanding of words, phrases and sentences and join in/respond in an appropriate way.
  • Explore the patterns and sounds of language through songs and rhymes and link the spelling, sound and meaning of words.
  • Children can read or listen to a short text with a familiar rhyme/song and can identify patterns of language and letter strings
  • Engage in conversations; ask and answer questions; express opinions and respond to those of others; seek clarification and help
  • Children can ask and answer questions on a variety of topics expressing opinions with understandable accuracy, using word/picture prompts
  • Speak in sentences, using familiar vocabulary, phrases and basic language structures.
  • Children use their knowledge of the letter strings and sounds to read an unfamiliar text with understandable accuracy.
  • Present ideas and information orally to a range of audiences.
  • Manipulate language using a language scaffold to present their own ideas and information in more complex sentences.
  • Develop accurate pronunciation and intonation so that others understand when they are reading aloud or using familiar words and phrases.
  • Children can attempt to say an unfamiliar word using their knowledge of letter strings, silent letter rules and liaison (the letters s, x, z, t, d, n and m are usually silent however if the next word begins with a vowel then they are pronounced)
  • Key phonemes/graphemes: ch, ou, er, et on/ain, oi, silent letters
Skills
  • Read carefully and show understanding of words, phrases and simple writing.
  • Children can attempt to read for follow more complex sentences with understandable accuracy using familiar vocabulary and when they come across unfamiliar vocabulary they can understand the gist of what is being said.
  • Broaden their vocabulary and develop their ability to understand new words that are introduced into the familiar written material, including through using a dictionary.
Children can find out the meaning of new words by reading around the word.
  • Children can also use a bi-lingual dictionary to accurately read and understand the meaning and word class of a word- is it a noun, adjective etc?
Understanding
  • Describe people, places, things and actions orally and in writing.
  • Write phrases from memory, and adapt these to create new sentences, to express ideas clearly
  • Children can write some familiar complex sentences to describe people, places and actions, from memory, using a language scaffold, with understandable accuracy including the use of simple connectives and adjectives.
  • Children are aware that if a noun is masculine, the adjective also needs to be masculine-children can demonstrate this in their writing.
  • Children show an awareness to the definite articles (le, la, les etc) what they mean and when you use them in relation the gender of a word.
  • Children also show an understanding of the placement of adjectives before or after the noun. Children aware that if a word ends in a vowel and the next word starts with one, then you drop the first vowel and replace it with an apostrophe. (elision)
  • Il y a
  • Il n’ya pas
  • Revision of numbers
  • Où est? (Where is?)
  • Adjectives (Colours)
  • J’aime
  • Je n’aime pas
  • Je voudrais
  • J’ai

Theme 2 - Relationships

Knowledge
  • To work collaboratively towards shared goals
  • To develop strategies to resolve disputes and conflict through negotiation and appropriate compromise and to give rich and constructive feedback and support to benefit others as well as themselves
  • That differences and similarities between people arise from a number of factors, including family, cultural, ethnic, racial and religious diversity, age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, and disability (see ‘protected characteristics’ in the Equality Act 2010)
  • To realise the nature and consequences of discrimination, teasing, bullying and aggressive behaviours (including cyber bullying, use of prejudice-based language, how to respond and ask for help)
  • to recognise and manage ‘dares’
  • to recognise and challenge stereotypes
  • Theme 3- Wider World: to appreciate the range of national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom
Skills
  • Respect and Tolerance
  • Help pupils to acquire an understanding of, and respect for, their own and other cultures and ways of life.
  • Organise visits to places of worship.
  • Develop links with faith communities.
  • Develop critical personal thinking skills.
Understanding
  • Ummah (Community)/Resurrection
Knowledge
  • Can select and refine appropriate skills according to the strengths and weaknesses of an opponent.
  • Can mark an opponent and knows appropriate skills to win the ball or prevent them from receiving the ball.
  • Knows the 9 fielding positions. Moves into effective fielding positions for different batters.
  • Can help umpire. Knows how to score half rounders.
  • Can design and perform imaginative sequences remembering and repeating with confidence and fluency.
  • Identify where strength and suppleness in required in their own and others work and devise safe warm-up and cool down routines to address them.
  • Can perform ideas that express comic, dramatic or abstract ideas.
  • Can identify strengths and weaknesses in their own and others performances.
  • Can explain how the practice they are using will affect their performance.
  • Can use appropriate dance terminology to describe, analyse, interpret and evaluate.
  • Pupils can describe what they can do to improve their fitness.
  • Pupils can utilise their core strength to perform to a high level.
Skills
  • To travel appropriately and effectively dependent on the sporting activity.
  • To apply different throwing and catching techniques with consistent control and accuracy.
  • Can perform a range of throwing, jumping and running skills with control, accuracy, power and good technique.
  • Demonstrates a good range of skills used over different times and distances
  • Can use an increasing variety of passing and receiving techniques with precision and control.
  • Bowls accurately with few no balls, shows good snap of the wrist release, shows correct stance, times swing with correct arm action.
  • Catches most hits but may drop a high ball under pressure.
  • Stops hard ground balls using long barrier. Throws deep field.
  • Hits ball with power towards spaces.
  • Show control, balance and strength.
  • Perform advanced movements with agility and co-ordination.
  • Perform single and linked actions accurately including a wider range of skills, actions and agilities; rolls, flights partner supports and balances and some vaults showing tension, extension and weight transfer.
Understanding
  • Performs effectively in different events by adapting their skills to meet the challenges and tasks set.
  • Understands backwards hit rules.
  • Applies tactics in game situations.
  • Can create and perform dances taking into account a range of movements, motifs, group relationships and available space.
  • To be able to work as an effective team member by communicating, collaborating and leading where appropriate.
  • Show increasing awareness of how to cope with orienteering events successfully.
  • Plan and trial their skills accurately, effectively and confidently.
  • Have confidence to attempt new tasks.
  • Make effective decisions.
  • Adapt approaches to meet the challenges of different environments.
  • Take on roles and responsibilities.
  • Can analyse their own and others’ performance including the role of an official and identify ways they can improve.
  • Pupils modify and refine skills and techniques to improve their performance.
  • Pupils refine skills and techniques to improve performance.
  • Pupils analyse and comment on skills and techniques.
  • Review their work identifying strengths and weaknesses.
  • Suggest alternative approaches.
  • Try out different approaches.
  • Can apply knowledge after evaluation to improve their work.
  • Can analyse a performance against specific criteria and give accurate feedback.
  • Can identify specific aspects for improvement in their own and others work and utilise them.

RE Concept: Ummah (Community)

Link to Whole School Focus: What is our responsibility towards the worldwide community?

RE Focus: Focus on Ummah, the Islamic worldwide community and the Christian response to worldwide responsibility (Christian Aid, Values, etc.). What does this mean to believers and what is their responsibility within this?

RE Concept: Resurrection (Easter Spr 2)

RE Focus: An investigation into resurrection within the Easter Story and the significance to believers.

Knowledge
  • Spring 1: Christian teaching about the importance of specific values, eg: love, forgiveness, self-sacrifice, justice, commitment.
  • Islam: Islamic values
  • The importance of key values, eg: aspects of family life, such as home life for children, leadership, role of parents, respect for elders and the wise, preparing for festivals, social life, including the role of the mosque, the importance of honesty and good manners, the unity of the umma (Muslim community).
  • Spring 2 (Easter): Festivals and celebrations Christmas, Holy Week and Easter, eg: the story, celebrations, symbols and meanings associated with Christmas, Holy Week and Easter.
  • Aspects of Jesus’ life as told in the Gospel stories, eg: the events of the last week of his life and the resurrection stories
Skills
  • Reflect on their own experience of, and responses to, the concept.
  • Respond to others’ ideas and situations.
  • Recognise human experience which may be different from their own.
  • Express how their responses to the concept may be applied in specific situations.
  • Identify the issues raised in applying their responses to specific situations.
  • Recognise some of the difficulties or problems involved in developing a coherent set of beliefs and values.
  • Recognise the complexity of concepts.
  • Frame questions (problematising the concept).
  • Define and analyse concepts by forming criteria.
  • Construct explanations.
  • Give good reasons and distinguish good from bad reasons.
  • Construct inferences (if … then …).
  • Explore the interpretation of concepts. demand further engagement.
  • Recognise that differing religious, social and cultural contexts influence interpretations and raise sometimes controversial issues that demand further engagement.
  • Express and communicate their understanding of why context influences interpretation of a concept.
  • Build capacity to compare different interpretations of concepts by giving examples.
  • Show sensitivity to the interpretations of the concept in the context.
  • Form an evaluative judgement about the significance of the concept within the given context and without.
  • Discern and clarify the reasons behind different judgements, including their own and those of others.
  • Recognise specific characteristics which make a difference in forming a judgement.
  • Express the value the concept has beyond the context.
Understanding
  • Describe and explain concepts that are common to many religions (for example, deity, sacred, myth, symbol, ritual, rites of passage, pilgrimage)
  • Describe and explain how a concept is expressed in different ways in Christianity and one (or more) other religions (for example, how different denominations in Christianity regard pilgrimage and the significance of the Hajj to Muslims)
  • Describe and explain their own opinions about the way religious concepts are expressed (for example, what do pupils think about the value of Christians making a pilgrimage to Lourdes or Muslims making a pilgrimage to Makkah?)
  • Describe and explain their own views about a concept (for example, do pupils value the idea of going on a journey to remember something significant?)
  • Describe and explain when and how a concept has applied to events or experiences in their own or others’ lives (for example, pupils describe where, when and why they have been or would like to go on a journey to remember something significant – such as to the house where dad was born or a revered football ground).

Evolution and Inheritance

Knowledge
  • Recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago
  • Recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents
  • Identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution
Skills
  • Using test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests.
  • Reporting and presenting findings in an appropriate way, best suited to their enquiry.
  • Identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments.
Understanding
  • Some organisms reproduce sexually where offspring inherit information from both parents.
  • Some organisms reproduce asexually by making a copy of a single parent.
  • Fossils provide evidence that Living things have changed over time.
  • Organisms best suited to their environment are more likely to survive long enough to reproduce.
  • Competition exists for resources and mates.
  • Organisms best adapted to reproduced are more likely to do so.
  • Organisms reproduce and offspring have similar characteristics to parents.
  • Variation exists within a population (and between offspring of same parents).
  • Life cycles have evolved to help organisms survive to adulthood.

Summer Term: Pride

Pride

Knowledge
  • Independently develop a range of ideas which show curiosity, imagination and originality
  • Systematically investigate, research and test ideas and plans using sketchbooks and other appropriate approaches (for instance. Sketchbooks will show in advance how work will be produced and how the qualities of materials will be used)
  • Independently take action to refine their technical and craft skills in order to improve their mastery of materials and techniques
  • Independently select and effectively use relevant processes in order to create successful and finished work
  • Provide a reasoned evaluation of both their own and professionals’ work which takes account of the starting points, intentions and context behind the work
  • By the end of Yr. 6 pupils should know:
  • How to describe, interpret and explain the work, ideas and working practices of some significant artists, craftspeople, designers and architects taking account of the influence of the different historical, cultural and social contexts in which they worked.
  • About the technical vocabulary and techniques for modifying the qualities of different materials and processes.
Skills
  • Sketching Cynthia Gregor
  • To develop an awareness of composition, scale and proportion within my painting.
  • To show awareness of how drawings are created.
  • Painting Ally Kotogo
  • To identify primary secondary, complementary and contrasting colours.
  • To use complimentary colours within my painting.
  • Sculpture Nick Mc Mann
  • To develop skills in using clay (Inc. slabs, coils and slips)
  • To produce intricate patterns and textures in a malleable media.
Understanding
  • Can they explain why they have combined different tools to create their drawings?
  • Can they explain why they have chosen specific drawing techniques?
  • Can they explain what their own style is?
  • Can they use a wide range of techniques in their work?
  • Can they explain why they have chosen specific painting techniques?
  • Can they make a record about the styles and qualities in their work?
  • Can they say what their work is influenced by?
  • Can they include technical aspects in their work, e.g. architectural design?
  • Do their sketch books contain detailed notes, and quotes explaining about items?
  • Do they compare their methods to those of others and keep notes in their sketch books?
  • Do they combine graphics and text based research of commercial design, for example magazines etc., to influence the layout of their sketch books.
  • Do they adapt and refine their work to reflect its meaning and purpose, keeping notes and annotations in their sketch books?
Knowledge
  • That food is grown (such as tomatoes, wheat and potatoes), reared (such as pigs, chickens and cattle) and caught (such as fish) in the UK, Europe and the wider world
  • That seasons may affect the food available
  • How food is processed into ingredients that can be eaten or used in cooking
  • How to prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes safely and hygienically including, where appropriate, the use of a heat source
  • How to use a range of techniques such as peeling, chopping, slicing, grating, mixing, spreading, kneading and baking
  • That recipes can be adapted to change the appearance, taste, texture and aroma
  • That different food and drink contain different substances – nutrients, water and fibre – that are needed for health
Skills
  • Know that food is grown (such as tomatoes, wheat and potatoes), reared (such as pigs, chickens and cattle) and caught (such as fish) in the UK, Europe and the wider world.
  • Understand that seasons may affect the food available.
  • Understand how food is processed into ingredients that can be eaten or used in cooking.
  • Know how to prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes safely and hygienically including, where appropriate, the use of a heat source
  • Understand how to use a range of techniques such as peeling, chopping, slicing, grating, mixing, spreading, kneading and baking.
  • Know different food and drink contain different substances – nutrients, water and fibre – that are needed for health
Understanding
  • Know that food is grown (such as tomatoes, wheat and potatoes), reared (such as pigs, chickens and cattle) and caught (such as fish) in the UK, Europe and the wider world.
  • Understand that seasons may affect the food available.
  • Understand how food is processed into ingredients that can be eaten or used in cooking.
  • Know how to prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes safely and hygienically including, where appropriate, the use of a heat source
  • Understand how to use a range of techniques such as peeling, chopping, slicing, grating, mixing, spreading, kneading and baking.
  • Know different food and drink contain different substances – nutrients, water and fibre – that are needed for health
Knowledge
  • Locate the world’s countries using maps, globes and atlases focusing on the wider world.
  • Identify the human and physical characteristic of these countries.
  • Identify the land use, economic activities including trade links and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.
  • Complete a local study of fieldwork.
Skills
  • Use the 8 compass points, grid referencing, symbols and keys to build knowledge of the UK and the wider world.
  • Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods.
  • Take pictures as evidence and present your findings. Compare pictures taken form the past to the present. What is similar? What is different? How have things changed over time.
Understanding
  • Present your findings in a variety of ways and speak confidently about your investigation.
  • Evaluate your findings and suggest reasons for the results.
  • Understanding how trading works around the world and the methods of the distribution of natural resources.

Non-European study that contrasts with British History (Baghdad AD900/ early Islamic civilisation including study of Baghdad c 900AD/Mayan civilisation c.900 AD/Benin (west Africa c. 900-1300)

Knowledge
  • Continue to develop chronologically secure knowledge of history through eras studied and contrasting and similar surrounding eras to gather a holistic view of the passing of time.
  • Establish clear narratives within and across periods studied applying historical terms confidently and accurately.
  • Show an understanding of connections, contrasts and trends over time, building on prior chronological knowledge and understanding, through studied era/s.
Skills
  • Continue to develop the appropriate use of historical terms.
  • Apply historical terms throughout other areas of historical learning.
Understanding
  • Continue to regularly address and devise historically valid questions.
  • Understand how knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources and how the reliability of these sources affects our understanding.
  • Construct informed responses by selecting and organising relevant historical information
  • Understand that different versions of the past may exist, giving some reasons for this.

Project based French Revision of all core structures

Knowledge
  • Listen attentively to spoken language and show understanding by joining in and responding.
  • Children can listen and show understanding of words, phrases and sentences and join in/respond in an appropriate way.
  • Explore the patterns and sounds of language through songs and rhymes and link the spelling, sound and meaning of words.
  • Children can read or listen to a short text with a familiar rhyme/song and can identify patterns of language and letter strings
  • Engage in conversations; ask and answer questions; express opinions and respond to those of others; seek clarification and help
  • Children can ask and answer questions on a variety of topics expressing opinions with understandable accuracy, using word/picture prompts
  • Speak in sentences, using familiar vocabulary, phrases and basic language structures.
  • Children use their knowledge of the letter strings and sounds to read an unfamiliar text with understandable accuracy.
  • Present ideas and information orally to a range of audiences.
  • Manipulate language using a language scaffold to present their own ideas and information in more complex sentences.
  • Develop accurate pronunciation and intonation so that others understand when they are reading aloud or using familiar words and phrases.
  • Children can attempt to say an unfamiliar word using their knowledge of letter strings, silent letter rules and liaison (the letters s, x, z, t, d, n and m are usually silent however if the next word begins with a vowel then they are pronounced)
  • Key phonemes/graphemes: ch, ou, er, et on/ain, oi, silent letters
Skills
  • Read carefully and show understanding of words, phrases and simple writing.
  • Children can attempt to read for follow more complex sentences with understandable accuracy using familiar vocabulary and when they come across unfamiliar vocabulary they can understand the gist of what is being said.
  • Broaden their vocabulary and develop their ability to understand new words that are introduced into the familiar written material, including through using a dictionary.
  • Children can find out the meaning of new words by reading around the word.
  • Children can also use a bi-lingual dictionary to accurately read and understand the meaning and word class of a word- is it a noun, adjective etc?
Understanding
  • Describe people, places, things and actions orally and in writing.
  • Write phrases from memory, and adapt these to create new sentences, to express ideas clearly
  • Children can write some familiar complex sentences to describe people, places and actions, from memory, using a language scaffold, with understandable accuracy including the use of simple connectives and adjectives.
  • Children are aware that if a noun is masculine, the adjective also needs to be masculine-children can demonstrate this in their writing.
  • Children show an awareness to the definite articles (le, la, les etc) what they mean and when you use them in relation the gender of a word.
  • Children also show an understanding of the placement of adjectives before or after the noun.
  • Children aware that if a word ends in a vowel and the next word starts with one, then you drop the first vowel and replace it with an apostrophe.

Theme 1- Health and Wellbeing

Knowledge
  • To recognise that they may experience conflicting emotions and when they might need to listen to their emotions or overcome them about change, including transitions (between Key Stages and schools), loss, separation, divorce and bereavement
  • Sex Education
  • How their body will change as they approach and move through puberty
  • To recognise how images in the media do not always reflect reality and can affect how people feel about themselves
  • About human reproduction
  • About people who are responsible for helping them stay healthy and safe and ways that they can help these people
Skills
  • Individual Liberty
  • Support pupils to develop their self-knowledge, self-esteem and self-confidence.
  • Encourage pupils to take responsibility for their behaviour, as well as knowing their rights.
  • Challenge stereotypes
Understanding
  • Worship (Ibadah-Islam)/Sin to Salvation
Knowledge
  • Can select and refine appropriate skills according to the strengths and weaknesses of an opponent.
  • Can mark an opponent and knows appropriate skills to win the ball or prevent them from receiving the ball.
  • Knows the 9 fielding positions, moves into effective fielding positions for different batters.
  • Can help umpire. Knows how to score half rounders.
  • Can design and perform imaginative sequences remembering and repeating with confidence and fluency.
  • Identify where strength and suppleness in required in their own and others work and devise safe warm-up and cool down routines to address them.
  • Can perform ideas that express comic, dramatic or abstract ideas.
  • Can identify strengths and weaknesses in their own and others performances.
  • Can explain how the practice they are using will affect their performance.
  • Can use appropriate dance terminology to describe, analyse, interpret and evaluate.
  • Pupils can describe what they can do to improve their fitness.
  • Pupils can utilise their core strength to perform to a high level.
Skills
  • To travel appropriately and effectively dependent on the sporting activity.
  • To apply different throwing and catching techniques with consistent control and accuracy.
  • Can perform a range of throwing, jumping and running skills with control, accuracy, power and good technique.
  • Demonstrates a good range of skills used over different times and distances
  • Can use an increasing variety of passing and receiving techniques with precision and control.
  • Bowls accurately with few no balls. Shows good snap of the wrist release. Shows correct stance.
  • Times swing with correct arm action.
  • Catches most hits but may drop a high ball under pressure.
  • Stops hard ground balls using long barrier. Throws deep field
  • Hits ball with power towards spaces.
  • Show control, balance and strength.
  • Perform advanced movements with agility and co-ordination.
  • Perform single and linked actions accurately including a wider range of skills, actions and agilities; rolls, flights partner supports and balances and some vaults showing tension, extension and weight transfer.
Understanding
  • Performs effectively in different events by adapting their skills to meet the challenges and tasks set.
  • Understands backwards hit rules.
  • Applies tactics in game situations.
  • Can create and perform dances taking into account a range of movements, motifs, group relationships and available space.
  • To be able to work as an effective team member by communicating, collaborating and leading where appropriate.
  • Show increasing awareness of how to cope with orienteering events successfully.
  • Plan and trial their skills accurately, effectively and confidently.
  • Have confidence to attempt new tasks.
  • Make effective decisions.
  • Adapt approaches to meet the challenges of different environments.
  • Take on roles and responsibilities.
  • Can analyse their own and others’ performance including the role of an official and identify ways they can improve.
  • Pupils modify and refine skills and techniques to improve their performance.
  • Pupils refine skills and techniques to improve performance.
  • Pupils analyse and comment on skills and techniques.
  • Review their work identifying strengths and weaknesses.
  • Suggest alternative approaches.
  • Try out different approaches.
  • Can apply knowledge after evaluation to improve their work.
  • Can analyse a performance against specific criteria and give accurate feedback.
  • Can identify specific aspects for improvement in their own and others work and utilise them.

RE Concept: Worship (Ibadah – Islam)

Link to Whole School Focus: How do we show we are included? What are our responsibilities within this? What behaviours do we display?

RE Focus: Exploration into Ibadah. With a particular focus on the Mosque and Christian Church (focus on denomination not C of E) to investigate how these buildings reflect the identity of those religions?

RE Concept: Sin to Salvation (Summer 2)

Link to Whole School Focus: Religion V war. Is war ever right? Conflict of interests?

RE Focus: How do Christians/Muslims regard sin? Salvation (Akhlaq in Islam)"

Knowledge
  • Summer 1: Worship and rites of passage
  • Examples of worship of at least two contrasting Christian denominations, eg: Anglican eucharist, Catholic Mass, Lord’s Supper, Pentecostal worship, Quaker meetings, Orthodox worship, Reformed worship.
  • Islam: Family and social life
  • Aspects of life within a Muslim home and mosque, eg:– birth and naming of children, how people greet each other, halal food laws, dhikr (the reciting of the names of Allah) and the use of the subhah(the beads used in worship).
  • The mosque- The significance, use, artefacts and symbolism of the mosque, eg: the role of the imam, the importance of the Qiblah – direction of the Ka’bah in Makkah, the main features of the mosque: mihrab, minbar, ablution area, the significance of Jumu’ah (Friday congregational prayers),t he role of the mosque as a welfare, social and religious centre.
  • Summer 2: The Christian story of salvation
  • The Christian story of salvation, eg: creation, fall, separation from God, salvation through Christ, the coming of the Holy Spirit.
Skills
  • Reflect on their own experience of, and responses to, the concept.
  • Respond to others’ ideas and situations.
  • Recognise human experience which may be different from their own.
  • Express how their responses to the concept may be applied in specific situations.
  • Identify the issues raised in applying their responses to specific situations.
  • Recognise some of the difficulties or problems involved in developing a coherent set of beliefs and values.
  • Recognise the complexity of concepts.
  • Frame questions (problematising the concept).
  • Define and analyse concepts by forming criteria.
  • Construct explanations.
  • Give good reasons and distinguish good from bad reasons.
  • Construct inferences (if … then …).
  • Explore the interpretation of concepts. demand further engagement.
  • Recognise that differing religious, social and cultural contexts influence interpretations and raise sometimes controversial issues that demand further engagement.
  • Express and communicate their understanding of why context influences interpretation of a concept.
  • Build capacity to compare different interpretations of concepts by giving examples.
  • Show sensitivity to the interpretations of the concept in the context.
  • Form an evaluative judgement about the significance of the concept within the given context and without.
  • Discern and clarify the reasons behind different judgements, including their own and those of others.
  • Recognise specific characteristics which make a difference in forming a judgement.
  • Express the value the concept has beyond the context.
Understanding
  • Describe and explain concepts that are common to many religions (for example, deity, sacred, myth, symbol, ritual, rites of passage, pilgrimage)
  • Describe and explain how a concept is expressed in different ways in Christianity and one (or more) other religions (for example, how different denominations in Christianity regard pilgrimage and the significance of the Hajj to Muslims)
  • describe and explain their own opinions about the way religious concepts are expressed (for example, what do pupils think about the value of Christians making a pilgrimage to Lourdes or Muslims making a pilgrimage to Makkah?)
  • Describe and explain their own views about a concept (for example, do pupils value the idea of going on a journey to remember something significant?)
  • Describe and explain when and how a concept has applied to events or experiences in their own or others’ lives (for example, pupils describe where, when and why they have been or would like to go on a journey to remember something significant – such as to the house where dad was born or a revered football ground).

Animals including humans and living things and their habitats

Knowledge
  • Describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animals give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics
  • Identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system, and describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood
  • Recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function describe the ways in which nutrients and water are transported within animals, including humans
Skills
  • Apply the skills from Autumn and Spring term with a focus on evaluating their findings using evidence and forming predictions for further enquires which are needed to ensure their ideas and findings are supported (or at times refuted).
Understanding
  • Revision of Year 4 understanding but in greater depth.
  • Organisms require a supply of energy and materials for which they are often dependent on or in competition with other organisms.